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This journal is a creative outlet of all the things Kali Brown loves, from fashion, diy's, art, museum galleries to even food.  I am not a professional blogger and the things I share are my sole opinion. Enjoy my creative voyage!

Filtering by Category: Exhibits

Daniel Arsham "Circa 2345"

Kali Abdullah

Kali Brown_Daniel Arsham Exhibit 1

This past weekend I viewed the Daniel Arsham "Circa 2345" exhibition at Galerie Perrotin, which recently opened Thursday, September 15th.  I love a good installation show and this one did not disappoint.

Kali Brown_Daniel Arsham Exhibit 2
Kali Brown_Daniel Arsham Exhibit 3

Arsham using a medium of crystalline calcite, created standout pieces such as a glowing Spalding ball, an intriguing tower of footballs, a Yankees Hat and a Chicago Bulls Jacket (to name a few) in this radiant blue/purplish hue.  The collection gives the illusion that you are viewing old deteriorated human artifacts of the past.  The intense blue tone in his work is a stark difference from his previous collections which were mostly monochromatic black and whites. Apparently this stark blue results from Arsham’s research in correcting his inherent colorblindness.  

Kali Brown_Daniel Arsham Exhibit 4
Kali Brown_Daniel Arsham Exhibit 5

On the lower level of the gallery, Arsham created this cave-like installation. Drawing on the themes of the fragility of human civilization and the nature of time itself, by transforming elemental materials such as stone, crystal, and ash into cultural artifacts. Arsham’s “Circa 2345” exhibit offers a glimpse into our current culture from the perspective of a future archeological site in the faraway future — from which the exhibition draws its name.

Kali Brown_Daniel Arsham Exhibit 6
Kali Brown_Daniel Arsham Exhibit 7

His work may seem familiar to you because Usher featured two views of a sculpture in this same archaeological style for his new album cover art.  It was a collaboration between the two (artist and musician) and apparently Usher spent four hours sitting still while Arsham put him through the process of creating an ancient statuesque piece that might be discovered in sometime in the future.

Daniel Arsham's Exhibit: 

September 15th - October 22, 2016 

Galerie Perrotin - 909 Madison Ave, NYC 11021

 

 

 

29 Rooms

Kali Abdullah

29 Rooms-Gurls Talk-1

This past weekend Refinery29 created one of the coolest interactive installations I've been to in a long time.  My favorite art enthusiast and adventure sidekick Cory and I were so stoked for this event that we talked about it for days and made sure we arrived there early to avoid a long wait and major queuing. Open for only three days (September 9-11) visitors had the opportunity to explore 29 Rooms and immerse themselves into a wonderland of fashion, beauty, design, art, and technology while being able to capture and share the amazing moments and obligatory selfies on social media platforms.

29 Rooms

The 29 Rooms event took place in a massive 80,000 square foot warehouse in Bushwick Brooklyn.  Each room had a different theme, some were designed by individual artists, and others collaborated with various brands such as Perrier, Ulta, Papyrus, Google and Michael Kors.  Some of the collaborators included artist Baron Von Fancy, Broad City‘s Abbi Jacobson, singer Tinashe, actor Adrian Grenier, artistic director for Diesel Nicola Formichetti, RuPaul, makeup artist Ryan Burke, and interactive artist Daniel Rozinare.

"Show Your Pride" room, photo by Kali Brown

"Show Your Pride" room, photo by Kali Brown

Ulta's "Beauty Wonderland" Room, photo by Kali Brown

Ulta's "Beauty Wonderland" Room, photo by Kali Brown

Lonely Whale Foundation "Turn the Tide" room, photo by Kali Brown

Lonely Whale Foundation "Turn the Tide" room, photo by Kali Brown

29 Rooms - Cory
Adwoa Aboa's "Gurls Talk" room, photo by Kali Brown

Adwoa Aboa's "Gurls Talk" room, photo by Kali Brown

The most popular rooms were those that combined interactivity with great photo opp's, such as the Gurls Talk room created by founder Adwoa Aboa.  The room had an installation with over 500 old-school pink telephone receivers hanging from the ceiling. 

When you put the gold phones to your ears you heard various voices. Later I learned that the people speaking through the phone were women that Aboah admires like activist Erica Garner, model Cara Delevinge and Denise Gough.

In the “You-niverse” room you could get an "aura photo" taken or a Polaroid portrait that reads your spiritual energy through color.  The line for this room was very long and you had to pay a $15 fee for the picture so I skipped that and just took cool photos in the room decorated like a moonscape, with tons of brightly lit stars and moon-like sand covering the floor.  

Perrier "Beyond the Bubbles" Room, photo by Kali Brown

Perrier "Beyond the Bubbles" Room, photo by Kali Brown

One of my favorite rooms was the “Beyond the Bubbles” room created by Perrier. It was filled with hundreds of balloon displays to give the illusion of bubbles. Also, I loved  RuPaul’s “Wig Out” room, which had these amazing over the top wigs that you could pose under in a salon chair.

Here are some of my favorite flicks while at 29 Rooms.

Ford's "Garden of Energi" room, photo by Kali Brown

Ford's "Garden of Energi" room, photo by Kali Brown

Ford was promoting its environmentally-friendly Fusion Energi car, in a glowing garden installation.  But what made Ford really win was the complimentary rides they offered to guest as they were leaving the event. Our driver Joe was awesome and got us to our next destination in less than ten minutes.

29 Rooms-Ford -1
In our complimentary Ford car

In our complimentary Ford car

Overall it was a wonderful experience. Some rooms were more interesting than others and it was a little sensory overload, but Cory and I had a blast.  It was a great event and I can’t wait until next year! 

Fairy Tale Fashion

Kali Abdullah

Fairy Tale Fashion Entrance

I finally had an opportunity to stop by my alma mater FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology) and take a glimpse at the Fairy Tale Fashion exhibit at their museum. I LOVE COSTUMES particularly those in correlation with fairy tales. Television shows like Once Upon A Time or movies such as Snow White and the Huntsman will always get a front row viewing from me because I am in awe at the craftsmanship and skill that is put into these wardrobes.  It is this fascination that turns me into a mad scientist around Halloween because I have to always top my much-involved costume from the year before (but we will get more into that closer to Halloween). Anyway I think you get my point, I love a good costume and this exhibit was a wonderful way to spend the afternoon.

The Little Mermaid, Jean Louis Sabaji sea foam evening gown.

The Little Mermaid, Jean Louis Sabaji sea foam evening gown.

Curated by Colleen Hill, Fairy Tale Fashion is a unique and imaginative exhibition that examines fairy tales through the lens of high fashion. The costumes were selected for its direct reference to clothing or its mention of important recurring motifs from 15 tales by prominent writers such as Charles Perrault, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen, and Lewis Carroll.

(l to r) Snow White, Judith Leiber apple minaudier; Charlotte Olympia book clutch bag

(l to r) Snow White, Judith Leiber apple minaudier; Charlotte Olympia book clutch bag

This exhibition features more than 80 objects placed within dramatic, fantasy-like settings designed by architect Kim Ackert. Since fairy tales are not often set in a specific time period, Fairy Tale Fashion includes garments and accessories dating from the 18th century to the present. There is a particular emphasis on extraordinary 21st-century fashions by designers such as Thom Browne, Dolce and Gabbana, Tom Ford, Giles, Mary Katrantzou, Marchesa, Alexander McQueen, Rick Owens, Prada, Rodarte, and Walter Van Beirendonck, among others.

I photographed my favorite pieces, sorry for the quality of the images I forgot my camera and had to resort to the cell phone and it was a pretty dark room. There's no need to go into detail about the costumes everything was awesome and I think the pictures speak for themselves. 

Little Red Riding Hood, Comme des Garcons (Rei Kawakubo) hooded ensemble

Little Red Riding Hood, Comme des Garcons (Rei Kawakubo) hooded ensemble

(l to r) Sleeping Beauty, Marchesa evening gown; Zuhair Murad haute couture gown

(l to r) Sleeping Beauty, Marchesa evening gown; Zuhair Murad haute couture gown

(l to r) Bibhu Mohapatra white evening gown; Zandra Rhodes gold dress

(l to r) Bibhu Mohapatra white evening gown; Zandra Rhodes gold dress

(l to r) The Queen of Hearts, Hideki Seo; The Bear Prince, Thom Browne

(l to r) The Queen of Hearts, Hideki Seo; The Bear Prince, Thom Browne

Sleeping Beauty's Court, Dolce and Gabbana

Sleeping Beauty's Court, Dolce and Gabbana

(l to r) The Snow Queen, J. Mendel hooded cape and evening dress;  Tom Ford mirrored dress

(l to r) The Snow Queen, J. Mendel hooded cape and evening dress;  Tom Ford mirrored dress

If you are in New York City definitely check out the show in person.  The exhibit is up until April 16th at The Museum at FIT on 7th Ave and 27th Street.

Find Us On The Map

Kali Abdullah

Satirist Sports by Andile Buka

Satirist Sports by Andile Buka

Last week I went to the opening of Find Us On The Map! a photo exhibition presented by Lagos Photo and Rush Arts Gallery.

The exhibit explores recurring themes in contemporary visual culture in Africa and encourages the audience to Find Us on the Map in accordance with the title of the exhibition.  Though there is now a widespread awareness that Africa is not a country, are we better informed about the vast geographical entity? We may be able to name a few countries within Africa but can we find them on a map? 

Nigerian Identity by Ima Mfon

Nigerian Identity by Ima Mfon

Some of the featured exhibits include Ima Mfon's Nigerian Identity series that tackles the false stereotype of homogenized blackness.  In this series of photographic portraits all the subjects are presented in a uniform manner, photographed on a white seamless background, looking directly into the lens, and enhanced so that their skin tones are virtually identical.  This idea stems from Mfon's experiences living in America where "black" has always been used as a generic descriptive label.  By using a plain background he eliminated any cultural or ethnic context, whether it be urban or an African wilderness and he makes the skin tones in these images rich, deep and beautiful to celebrate beautiful skin that's often oppressed and marginalized.

Nigerian Identity by Ima Mfon

Nigerian Identity by Ima Mfon

Jenevieve Aken's series Great Expectations is inspired by Dickens iconic novel of the same title. "Society today, especially in Africa, places a huge emphasis on marriage as an institution and this leads to pressures and stress on a lot of women some of whom are successful but yet feel unfulfilled until married. Happiness, love, friendship are all after thoughts. Marriage first." Jenevieve immersed herself and reinterpreted this story in contemporary Africa-Nigeria society through self-portraiture.

Great Expectations by Jenevieve Akens

Great Expectations by Jenevieve Akens

Great Expectations by Jenevieve Akens

Great Expectations by Jenevieve Akens

My favorite collection was by Andile Buka from South Africa who's portrait series Sartist Sport takes a more comical approach to identity.  It was created as a result of wanting to challenge previous edifice ideas of what it means to be black or African in modern society.  The project started as the untold story about urban black sports culture and black identity. It highlights South African athletes, people who went through difficult circumstances, the remnants of colonialism and apartheid when sports were seen as a novelty for black people, a "white man's" activity. The series was to challenge previously conceived ideas of South African black culture that have social and cultural impacts using clothes that were seen only being worn by white people.

Satirist Sports by Andile Buka

Satirist Sports by Andile Buka

Other exhibiting artists include Joana Choumali (Cote d'Ivoire), Colin Delfosse (Belgium), Logo Olumuyiwa (Nigeria), and Nobukho Nqaba (South Africa).

Photography was initially used in Africa to engage audiences with a place that at the time was a complete fantasy. African art, objects, dress, people, and lifestyles were photographed as a means to inform us of the otherness of Africa.  These fantasies of Africa, based on very real objects, artwork, and peoples in the past, were the foundation introduction to a continent of 54 independent countries and more than 3,000 ethnic groups. Today, the concept of fantasy is reclaimed and repurposed to narrate stories and engage viewers in innovative ways.

Curated by art historian and artist Chika Okeke-Agula, she said "Folks can't seem to come to terms with the fact that African artists have now taken and secured their seat at the dinner table invited or not.  With works of art from Africa receiving long deserved acclaim from museums, curators, and collectors, finding these places on the map becomes a prerequisite for us to be allowed to sit at the table with them.  As we begin to develop our understanding of art created on the continent beyond the antiquated, overarching, and superficial title of 'African art', we seek additional information that gives us clues about society religion, and love in African countries."

The show is on exhibit from March 17 - April 8th at Rush Arts Gallery, 526 West 26th Street, Suite 311 NYC

 

Picasso Baby

Kali Brown

Picasso Sculpture Exhibit (photo by Kali Brown)

Picasso Sculpture Exhibit (photo by Kali Brown)

Last weekend before the major east coast blizzard I went to the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), here in NYC. I went mainly to sign up for a museum membership but while I was there I had an opportunity to check out the Picasso Sculpture exhibition, which is one of the first of it's kind in the United States in half a century. Overall I thought the exhibit was ok. You could see where many of his influences were derived from.  The piece above was my favorite out of the collection, it's definitely African influenced. The exhibit ends February 7th so you have about two weeks to check it out.

While exploring the rest of the MoMA collection I stumbled across this one sculpture that really caught my eye. The piece (below) is called The Impossible III by artist Maria Martins. I found this sculpture very powerful and my interpretation of how life is sometimes. I love it!

The Impossible III, artist Maria Martins (photo by Kali Brown)

The Impossible III, artist Maria Martins (photo by Kali Brown)